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Demolition Proposal Template

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Table of Contents

What is the purpose of a demolition plan?

A demolition plan is meant to be a strategy for a contractor to tear down a structure or building without harming people or the environment nearby.

What goes into a demolition plan?

A plan for demolition involves the location of the building, distances from adjacent buildings, roads, structures nearby and a strategy to tear down the building without harming others.

How do you write a proposal for a construction project?

Simply sign up with Bonsai and edit out pre-made proposal templates. Our ready-to-edit templates come with an example cover letter and detailed plan of action you can reference and edit.

Working as a demolition contractor means more than just tearing things down. In many cases, you'll also be responsible for putting together a demolition proposal outlining the work that needs to be done. A demolition proposal can help you win new business and ensure you're paid fairly for your work.

In this article, we'll take a look at what goes into a demolition proposal and how you can put one together for your next project.

Note: If you need a demolition proposal template, try Bonsai. Bonsai's templates are easy to customize and easy to send. Just sign up, personalize and send your demolition bid to a potential client. Claim your free trial here.

What exactly is a demolition proposal?

A demolition proposal is a document that is submitted to a client to get approval for the demolition of a structure.

This document outlines the entire demolition process, from start to finish. It makes it clear what is going to be demolished, as well as any safety or environmental concerns that need to be taken into account. It also includes a detailed timeline of the demolition process and an estimate of the total project price.

Sometimes, a demolition proposal can also include a site plan that shows where the debris from the demolition will be taken. This is especially important if the client is looking to have the site cleared and ready for new construction.

That said, a few reasons why a proposal can be crucial include:

  • It helps to ensure that both the demolition contractors and the client are on the same page from the start.
  • Putting together a well-thought-out proposal can help avoid any misunderstandings or surprises down the road.
  • It can also give the client a sense of confidence in the contractor's ability to safely and efficiently carry out the work.

What should you include in a demolition proposal?

We'll use an example to illustrate the different elements that should be included in a demolition proposal.

Let's say you're a demolition contractor who has been approached by a real estate developer to demolish an old office building that they own.

The first step in putting together your proposal would be to do a walk-through of the building with the developer. This is where you would assess what needs to be demolished and get an idea of the scope of the project. 

Your proposal might include this:

Proposed Work: The following is a list of the proposed work to be completed for the demolition of the Smith House.

  • Remove all hazardous materials from the house, including asbestos and lead-based paint.
  • Demolish the house using heavy machinery.
  • Remove debris from the site and dispose of it properly.
  • Prepare the site for new construction.

Next, you would put together a timeline for the demolition process. This is important to ensure that the project stays on schedule and that there are no surprises along the way. 

Your demolition contract might include this:

Timeline: The proposed timeline for the demolition of the Smith House is as follows:

  • Hazardous materials will be removed within two weeks.
  • The house will be demolished within two weeks.
  • All debris will be removed within three days.
  • The site will be ready for new construction within one week.

Finally, you would put together a cost estimate for the project and . This is usually done by calculating the cost of labor services, materials, and equipment rental.

Your demolition contract template might include the following terms:

Total project pricing: The estimated cost of the proposed work is $15,000 to be approved by the client prior to the completion date. The contractor will demolish the office building in its current standing for the pricing listed above, which includes the cost of:

  • removing all hazardous materials
  • demolishing the house
  • removing all debris
  • preparing the site for new construction

Once you have all of this information, you can put together a demolition proposal that outlines the entire project from start to finish, outlining the proposed work, timeline, and agreed amount.

Tips to consider when creating a demolition proposal

Putting together a demolition proposal can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn't have to be. Here are a few tips to help you get started:

Check state and local laws and regulations

Be sure to familiarize yourself with all state and local laws and regulations that might apply to your project. These laws and regulations can vary greatly from state to state, so you must do your homework before getting started.

Create a realistic timeline

More often than not, demolition projects run into delays. When putting together your timeline, be sure to factor in some additional time in case of unforeseen delays. This will help to ensure that your proposal is realistic and achievable.

Be concise and to the point

When writing a construction proposal, less is more. Be sure to get rid of any unnecessary fluff or filler in your proposal. Your client should be able to read your proposal and understand the scope of work without having to wade through a lot of unnecessary information.

Do your research

Make sure you understand the scope of the project and what is involved in the demolition process. This means familiarizing yourself with the property, the surrounding area, and the client's needs and expectations. And this can also mean knowing who the rightful and legal owner of the property address. The more information you have, the better equipped you'll be to put together a comprehensive proposal.

Download our free demolition contract template

Demolition can be a tricky business. There are a lot of moving parts and if just one thing goes wrong, it can throw the entire project off schedule and over budget. That's why it's important to put together a comprehensive proposal outlining the entire project from start to finish. 

With our free demolition proposal template, you can do just that. Simply download the template, fill in your information, and you're ready to go.

Demolition Proposal Template

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